T’ai Chi Chih is a mindfulness-moving meditation practice that’s easy to learn. The series of 19 movements and one pose helps circulate the Vital Energy, the Chi. Practitioners experience peace, improved health, and many more benefits. Our free monthly e-newsletter offers inspiration between issues of the TCC quarterly journal, The Vital Force, in which teachers and students tell stories about ways they’ve benefited from the practice. 

“The only thing permanent is change.” – Justin F. Stone, TCC Originator

From the May issue of The Vital Force:

Here: “An essential aspect of doing TCC is a precious benefit gained – a stillness of mind. Striving ceases as we lean into the present, attentive to the right here and the right now. The 19 movements are perfectly designed to move the conscientious practitioner from their head-fullness, with its overthinking, to the focal point of the practice: this moment, this shift, this yin-yang…. It’s the being of not being that takes hold. To be present to the present is not something we do as much as an opening to what’s already here.” – RD, Tulsa, OK

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Editor’s Note: 

Read more of RD’s and others’ experiences of the here and now in the May issue of The Vital Force.

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Now: “Now is the time to write. To Right the moment now. There is nothing more than this moment here and now that revealed the Ultimate Source. The Breath of Life Breathing in the infinite. The infinite that is unstoppable. The layering of energy and movement that ripples the water’s surface while life exists below the water line beneath the sky that expands into forever…. Life is a surprise as each moment is now…. Being in the presence of Life is Life. There is no other place to be but in the moment.” – CK, Albuquerque, NM

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Wonder: “The gift of seeing anew can provide a second gift: the spark of surprise evolving into the sparkle of wonder. How does wonder manifest? Seeing with new eyes, if acknowledged consciously, can interrupt an assumption or a habitual belief…offering an opportunity to study the subject at hand, in this case the self; self-study (i.e., gaining insight into thoughts and ideas we hold)…. This process begins with humility and sincerity – teh.” – JR, Portland, OR

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Impermanence: “Most suffering comes from failure to accept impermanence. Relationships change, health changes, and we grow older. Yet we tend to cling, as though pleasant circumstances can extend indefinitely. So we live … trying to preserve and resurrect what is pleasant and seeking to avoid its inevitable opposite, the painful…. The leaves will fall in autumn, there will be new leaves on the tree in the springtime. But is the tree itself impermanent? Enduring, yes, but infinite, no.” –  Justin F. Stone

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Want more inspiration? Want a connection with the global TCC community? Want tips for a better practice? Join us:

Subscribe to The Vital Force. Our quarterly journal offers engaging stories, hints, and insights from TCC teachers and students. We also highlight wisdom by, and photos rarely seen of, originator Justin Stone.


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